Components of Population Change – Southern Oregon Update

Components of Population Change – Southern Oregon Update

by Guy Tauer

June 7, 2017

Each year, Portland State University’s population research center releases additional population and demographic data in their Annual Population Report. One bit of interesting data from this report is the components of population change. Those are the figures that show natural population increase, which are births minus deaths. They also  show the population change from net migration – the difference between those that migrate in and residents who move out of the area.

These data show that Jackson County added residents from 2010 to 2016 from both natural increase and net migration. Klamath County and Oregon statewide also had natural population increase and positive net migration during that time. On the other hand, other counties in this corner of Oregon had more deaths than births, for a negative natural population change. Curry County (-1,185), Douglas County (-1,967), and Josephine County (-2,186) all had more deaths than births between 2010 and 2016. Josephine County had the greatest total natural population decrease among all Oregon counties from 2010 to 2016. Those counties with more deaths than births typically had a higher percentage of population age 65 and older. Curry County (32.4%), Josephine County (26.1%), and Douglas County (25.3%) had large shares of older residents.

On the other hand, only 16.8 percent of Oregon’s population were age 65 years and older. Jackson County (21.3%) and Klamath County (21.0%) also had slightly lower shares of older residents than those counties in Southern Oregon that had more deaths than births between 2010 and 2016.

Net migration was positive for nearly every Oregon county between 2010 and 2016. The exceptions were Malheur and Harney counties, where 442 and 69 more residents moved out than residents who migrated in during that time, respectively. Even among Southern Oregon counties where there was natural population increase, most of the total population increase was due to positive net migration.