Covered Employment and Wages in Yamhill County: 2016

by Pat O'Connor

July 19, 2017

Covered employment or quarterly census of employment and wages (QCEW) data is obtained through employers’ payroll tax records. The universe for QCEW includes businesses whose employees are covered by unemployment insurance. QCEW provides more detailed industry employment and payroll data than the current employment statistics (CES) estimates.

In 2016, total covered employment for Yamhill County was 34,540; down more than 60 jobs from 33,604 in 2015. The annual average wage in Yamhill County was $39,421 in 2016, less than the statewide average of $49,453.
Yamhill County’s average annual wage in 2016 was $39,421 which ranked 13th highest among Oregon’s 36 counties. Yamhill County’s average annual wage has consistently been less than the statewide average over the past 40 years. However, the gap has increased over the years. In 1976, Oregon’s average wage was almost 8 percent higher than Yamhill County’s average. By 2000 the statewide average wage was 21 percent higher than in Yamhill County. Following the “dot com” bubble burst the wage gap between Yamhill County and the state narrowed slightly. However, that gap grew worse beginning in 2009. In 2016, the statewide average wage was 25 percent higher than Yamhill County’s average.

Employment Gains and Losses in 2016

The QCEW series provides us with the changes in employment and also allows us to see if those employment gains and losses are occurring in industries with high or low average wages. 

Yamhill County shed more than 60 jobs from 2015 to 2016; losses of 139 in the private sector accounted for the loss, while the public sector grew slowly, adding 75 jobs to grow 1.6 percent. Employment gains and losses varied significantly by industry.

Construction (+179 jobs) and leisure and hospitality (+143) added the most jobs during 2016. Yamhill County’s construction sector also showed the fastest industry employment growth, growing nearly 12 percent in 2016. The fairly small information sector added 17 jobs in 2016 to grow nearly 9 percent.
Job loss was concentrated in three sectors: manufacturing; trade, transportation and utilities; and financial activities.

Manufacturing shed the most jobs in 2016. Employment declined 476 from its 2015 level, dropping 7.1 percent. Financial activities experienced the sharpest employment decline, dropping 12.1 percent from 2015 and shedding 135 jobs.

Trade, transportation, and utilities showed an annual employment decline of 115 jobs, or 2.4 percent, from 2015 to 2016. The losses were concentrated within Yamhill County’s transportation industry. The sub-sector transportation, warehousing, and utilities showed an employment decline of 179 from 2015 to 2016.     

The public sector as a whole showed 1.6 percent employment growth from 2015 to 2016, adding 75 jobs. However, employment varied when looking at a finer level of detail. Federal government employment added 9 jobs, or 1.9 percent, in 2016. Local government employment gained 38 jobs, or 1.1 percent, in 2016. State government in Yamhill County added 29 jobs in 2016 to grow 5.5 percent. The average wage in Yamhill County’s public sector is higher than the private-sector average wage in the area and the average wage in Yamhill County across all ownerships (private and public).

For more detailed industry employment and payroll data go to www.qualityinfo.org , under “Economic Data” select “Employment and Wages by Industry”. Covered employment and payroll data is available for Oregon’s counties from 2001 to the present.


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